Introduction to Adobe Illustrator

As missed a few sessions for Creative Features – design, I had to catch up. I caught up with the tutor he said to have a go at using illustrator. Straight away when opening the software, I noticed that the layout and navigation appears to be the same as ‘Adobe Photoshop’. This was a good thing for me as I have used Photoshop many times so understand the software to some degree. All the tools and pallets were in the exact place within the software. I did wonder why there was two software’s nearly identical to each other, however from speaking to the tutor, I gained more of an insight into the difference between Photoshop and Illustrator. Illustrator uses a vector system in which is a more mathematical way in using plots in different places (co-ordinates) to map out the image. Like a formula because of this it means that the image can be enlarged and swapped about without the image losing resolution. This is important, as it will not look pixelated and not to that high professional standard. This system and software is measured in (PPI) which means pixels per inch. Photoshop is different in the sense that it is a raster-based programme, this means it is measured in dots per inch (DPI). This means that it works on colour and in some circumstances it will be pixelated if needed to resize.

By having ago at using the software, I learned how to set up documents based on the specifications required for each individual project. For print, I noticed that there is a bleed area, this is space out side of the document, when printing it makes the edges smoother when cuts are made and gives it a more professional quality. The same thing is used in other software’s like InDesign. When I have used InDesign in the passed I set the bleed lines to around 5mm, I presume this would be similar on Illustrator.  From talking to the tutor I gained valuable information, that illustrator was first created to allow people to trace things. Also that it is similar to Photoshop in the sense that layers of detail can build up an overall project file that you can be happy with. As I have had more time on Photoshop, I find that it is easier to navigate my way around but with time and practice I believe I could be quite good on the software.  To show my understanding, of the software I recreated the logo that was used in my TV studio project for Estuary TV. This was originally designed by the people who was on the productions team.  This ‘Positive Outlook’ brand was designed for the programme and concept I came up with, to pitch to Estuary TV. The original brand logo was not as good as this one. This was the one I put forward.

Screen Shot 2015-10-26 at 20.26.11

Some of the key tools that I used was the ‘Black pointer’ tool this allowed me to scale, move and turn things around to the rotation that was best suited. This tool is very similar to that on InDesign, along with the white pointer tool which is used more to change paths, points and the angle that things run. There were other tools that I found I recognized which was the pen tool and flares. The pen tool can be useful when creating outlines and shapes. This tool is a bit more complicated and takes some time to get to grips with.

As a practitioner of media and journalism, it is incredibly important to have skills to allow me to create graphics, brands and logos. Not only for myself but for client’s. This software will allow me to do this to a high professional quality.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s